Personal Brands are Portable

“No matter where you go, there you are.” —The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (motion picture) (1984).

And everywhere you go, your online reputation follows.

If you haven’t searched your name online recently, do so. Put your name in quotes, like this “Wendy Terwelp,” to narrow the search parameters.

Next, use these questions to assess your online brand and visibility:

Your Social Media Profiles: Have you chosen the right social media networks for your target audience? Do your social media profiles contain a current professional photo, your one word that represents you, and a clear brand story about your background and experience? Does your profile pop with your personality?

Your Network: Who’s in your network? And who needs to know about you? Invite those who are a fit for your current goals. And those whom you’re confident in referring to others. Is it time to review and prune some of your current connections? Your network reflects your personal brand.

Your Thought Leadership: TED talks say “ideas worth sharing.” Are yours? Review the content you’re sharing. Is it relevant to your goals and helpful to your network and target audience?

Your Personal Brand Hub: If you haven’t done so already, grab your name as a domain. This way you can create and curate content about you in a personal brand hub. When people search on your name, this on-brand content will rise to the top of the search.

Time Savers: Maintaining a highly visible brand online doesn’t have to be time consuming. You can repurpose your content. If you’ve written an article or blog post, use quotes from it in other social media, like Twitter or LinkedIn, and include a link to your post. Take advantage of tools like Hootsuite to schedule posts in advance for consistency. And keep the conversation going by addressing responses in real time.

I invite you to share your results in the comments.

And if you’d like help in up-leveling your brand online, let’s talk!

©2018 Wendy Terwelp | All rights reserved.

Facebook: Should you add your boss as a friend?

Two pals of mine are quoted in this excellent article on how to use Facebook the RIGHT way. See great tips from Paul Copcutt, Square Peg Solution, and Jason Alba, Jibberjobber. Way to go!

Now on to the story’s topic: to share or not to share your personal life with your boss….

Allison Dunfield, Special to The Globe and Mail

When his boss found him on Facebook, a 26-year old worker with a Toronto theatre company thought nothing of accepting her request to make him her “friend.”

Now, he deeply regrets it.

“I ‘friended’ her, not really thinking anything of it, but she went through and looked at all my stuff,” he says.

That stuff included several photographs of him dancing in his living room, others of him “just standing around, looking forlorn off into the distance.”

His boss freely commented on them. About his dancing, she wrote: “Nice moves. I didn’t know you had it in you.” About looking forlorn: “You have that far-off look in your eyes.”

It all made him very uncomfortable, he says, as though she were invading a part of his life where she just did not belong.

 

Read on!

Create your brand online and get hired faster

Abridged: Kiplinger.com

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The last time Phylise Banner looked for a job, the job market was much different. And as someone who designs online distance-learning programs for a living, she knows the world has changed since she last pounded the pavement. “This is a different type of search,” says Banner. “I’m trying to create my own online agency to promote myself.”Banner maintains a profile on several social-networking sites, including a popular online address book that, can broadcast her job-seeking status to anyone keeping up with her comings and goings. Banner is ahead of a big curve. “Job seekers today don’t realize the extent to which social networks are a good tool to reach someone inside the corporation you’ve targeted,” says Gerry Crispin, a corporate-recruiting consultant at CareerXroads.

On her website, Banner has posted the full text of her resume, seeded with key words she’s researched for her industry. Time is still of the essence in a job search — it just moves quicker these days. Be among the first to know when a job opens up by also setting up automatic searches on job search engine sites. They’ll spider other sites, then send alerts to your e-mail address.

 

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Want more tips to crank up your brand online?

Check out: http://www.knocks.com/Social_Networking_Course.html.